This was some of the most delicious food I have ever eaten. 6 months later and my kids are still talking about how good it was. We had a huge variety of dishes in the two times we went here. The pesto noodles were a welcome change from heavier Asian options and my daughter truly enjoy her vegan pork chop. We are a little of everything but the walnut buns were decidedly the best food we ever tasted. My life goal is to find a recipe to make these at home. Don’t miss out on this place. Its truly wonderful.

Multiple Chinese herbs in the GallbladClear formula have been found in studies to carry out actions in modern biomedical terms supporting its use. These actions include increasing the secretion of bile from the liver and excretion of bile from the gallbladder; disintegrating sludge; increasing contraction of the gallbladder and movement of the bile duct; reducing the tension of the sphincter of Oddi, the muscular valve surrounding the exit of the bile duct.1


I'll start very briefly with the negatives! I wasn't a fan of the decor (or lack of), nor did I enjoy ordering from an iPad (since when did speaking to a human become so challenging), & the menu was good but slightly mish mash...noodles next to pesto pasta for example. The expats outnumbered locals by far, you can read what you want into that. As for the food: yum! The fried lotus root was so good, sweet and sour 'pork' was delightful and the 'ribs' were incredible. You'd pay an arm and a leg for vegan food that good in the UK so I'm not complaining! However, I do have one comment. The food seemed to be designed for a Western pallet...by that I mean it reminded me of a Chinese takeaway you would get on a Saturday night while watching TV. Very sweet and not too spicy. Of course it's 10x better than that and cruelty free which is fab!!! But if you want something more authentic Chinese then go to Godly (not far from People's Square). If you have time then go to both and decide for yourself! If you can only go to one then my preference would be Godly.
Huiyuan also enjoyed enormous popularity among the gentry of South China, for it was to this group that he primarily directed his literary efforts. Some thirty of his works, in the form of letters, essays, prefaces, eulogies, or inscriptions, are extant. Unlike Dao'an, who primarily wrote commentaries for the Buddhist clergy, Huiyuan addressed issues that most concerned the gentry: rebirth, the immortality of the soul, the doctrine of karman, and the nature of the dharmakāya. His previous classical training made him successful in explaining these concepts in terms of the philosophical outlook of the Chinese elite, which at the time was dominated by xuanxue ("dark learning") speculations into the underlying source (ben ) of phenomena. That he never once quoted a Buddhist sūtra by name but made numerous allusions to the Confucian classics attests to his fervent desire to bring Buddhism into the mainstream of Chinese spiritual and intellectual life. Modern scholars have identified certain areas in which Huiyuan's understanding of important Buddhist concepts deviates from that of the Indian texts. They have attributed this both to his concern to present Buddhist notions in a form comprehensible to the Chinese, as in his postulation of a cosmic soul (shen ) as a means of explaining the process of rebirth, or to his frank inability in some instances to master the subtleties of Buddhist doctrine. This is particularly evident in his treatment of the Mādhyamika concepts introduced into China by Kumārajīva. Huiyuan's correspondence with this, perhaps the greatest of all Buddhist translators, is one of our richest sources of information on the development of Buddhist thought in fifth-century China.
Qingdao, also known as for its romanized name, Tsingtao, it is a city located in the east coast of China and the main city of the Shandong Province. The city features for being an important seaport, counting with the world’s longest sea bridge, the Jiaozhou Bay Bridge. It is famous for being home of the popular Chinese beer Tsingtao. Along with Shanghai, Beijing, Dalian and Hong Kong, has a relevant importance as a global financial centre. Given its temperate climate, Qingdao is popular among not only local tourists, also international visitors. Regarding its interesting places, you shouldn’t miss Laoshan Mountain, an important Taoist centre, Qingdao church, and some of its beautiful beaches and some of its vestiges regarding Japanese and German architecture in Ba Da Guan, located in the Western Shinan district.

ok so i was watchin season 6 of the Xfiles...and i was watching 1 episode about a rare dog... called the Wanshang Dhole. now they say its an chinese dog of some kind...but being a TV show i dont know if it acually true or not. now im chinese so it interests me even more...i tried to google it, but all i came up with is just stuff about the episode, nothing about the atual dog.
So this has now become a regular on my circuit of restaurants. My brother was visiting me and I took him here to try the dumplings but more so to try the battered stuffed lotus root, they are similar to large thick slices of potato in batter that are served in chippies in Manchester where we grew up, also the mixed veg curry was amazing with fried potato, broccoli, mushrooms and carrot, this has become a must have. My most recent visit was with three other vegans, we ordered so much food the owner was worried we wouldn't finish it all, we did all but three steamed buns which we took away. The wheat gluten with veg is delicious, such a light tasty gravy. The walnut buns are almost like a pecan pie, the Buddha cakes are delicious 6 round green pastry cookies with sesame seeds and inside is taro or purple sweet potato. All our food for four people came to 369 rmb which is a bargain. My advice is to bring your own take away container and order more than you eat, you'll be glad to take away the leftovers and have them later. Also the staff are lovely and friendly.
On 3 September 2008, Atlantic Industries, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Coca-Cola Company, agreed to buy China Huiyuan Juice for HK$17.9 billion at HK$12.20 per share, three times more than its closing price of HK$4.14 on the previous day. Its shares closed at HK$10.94 on that day.[4] The proposed takeover was subject to anti-monopoly review by the Chinese Ministry of Commerce, which was scheduled to finish on 20 March 2009.[5] On 17 March, it was reported that Coca-Cola was considering abandoning the deal, as Chinese authorities insisted on relinquishing the Huiyuan brand name after acquisition.[6] On 18 March, the Ministry of Commerce disallowed the bid, citing market competition concerns.[7][8]
Sun Min, wife of a Chinese businessman, was found guilty of insider trading in Huiyuan shares by the Market Misconduct Tribunal in Hong Kong. The businessman, Mo Feng, and Sun purchased 8.61 million shares in the company between 30 July and 29 August 2008, at between HK$3.78 and 4.66 (US$0.48–$0.60), then resold their shares HK$10.24–$11.12 (US$1.21–$1.43) each on 3–4 Sept. 2008, after Huiyuan's stock price had surged after the proposed takeover was announced. A profit of HK$55.1 million (US$7.09 million) was made from the trade.[9] Sun was convicted of having dealt in 3.13 million Huiyuan shares in August 2008[10] and was fined HK$20 million (US$2.56 million), the largest ever imposed for the crime in the territory.[11]
I came here three days in a row. Food is great, everything I had was too sweet though, the reason might be Shanghai itself. They have lots of substitute for any kind of meat. Staff is friendly, they don't speak English but they have an English menu on tablet PC. Must be aware, menu is a bit deceptive, portions look so small that makes you feel like you have to order multiple options. Portions are fullfilling.
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