Huiyuan also enjoyed enormous popularity among the gentry of South China, for it was to this group that he primarily directed his literary efforts. Some thirty of his works, in the form of letters, essays, prefaces, eulogies, or inscriptions, are extant. Unlike Dao'an, who primarily wrote commentaries for the Buddhist clergy, Huiyuan addressed issues that most concerned the gentry: rebirth, the immortality of the soul, the doctrine of karman, and the nature of the dharmakāya. His previous classical training made him successful in explaining these concepts in terms of the philosophical outlook of the Chinese elite, which at the time was dominated by xuanxue ("dark learning") speculations into the underlying source (ben ) of phenomena. That he never once quoted a Buddhist sūtra by name but made numerous allusions to the Confucian classics attests to his fervent desire to bring Buddhism into the mainstream of Chinese spiritual and intellectual life. Modern scholars have identified certain areas in which Huiyuan's understanding of important Buddhist concepts deviates from that of the Indian texts. They have attributed this both to his concern to present Buddhist notions in a form comprehensible to the Chinese, as in his postulation of a cosmic soul (shen ) as a means of explaining the process of rebirth, or to his frank inability in some instances to master the subtleties of Buddhist doctrine. This is particularly evident in his treatment of the Mādhyamika concepts introduced into China by Kumārajīva. Huiyuan's correspondence with this, perhaps the greatest of all Buddhist translators, is one of our richest sources of information on the development of Buddhist thought in fifth-century China.
Huiyuan also enjoyed enormous popularity among the gentry of South China, for it was to this group that he primarily directed his literary efforts. Some thirty of his works, in the form of letters, essays, prefaces, eulogies, or inscriptions, are extant. Unlike Dao'an, who primarily wrote commentaries for the Buddhist clergy, Huiyuan addressed issues that most concerned the gentry: rebirth, the immortality of the soul, the doctrine of karman, and the nature of the dharmakāya. His previous classical training made him successful in explaining these concepts in terms of the philosophical outlook of the Chinese elite, which at the time was dominated by xuanxue ("dark learning") speculations into the underlying source (ben ) of phenomena. That he never once quoted a Buddhist sūtra by name but made numerous allusions to the Confucian classics attests to his fervent desire to bring Buddhism into the mainstream of Chinese spiritual and intellectual life. Modern scholars have identified certain areas in which Huiyuan's understanding of important Buddhist concepts deviates from that of the Indian texts. They have attributed this both to his concern to present Buddhist notions in a form comprehensible to the Chinese, as in his postulation of a cosmic soul (shen ) as a means of explaining the process of rebirth, or to his frank inability in some instances to master the subtleties of Buddhist doctrine. This is particularly evident in his treatment of the Mādhyamika concepts introduced into China by Kumārajīva. Huiyuan's correspondence with this, perhaps the greatest of all Buddhist translators, is one of our richest sources of information on the development of Buddhist thought in fifth-century China.
Das kleine Restaurant bietet Platz für ca. 20-30 Leute. Die Einrichtung ist einfach, aber sauber. Man bestellt via Tablet mit bebilderten Gerichten. Die Auswahl ist groß, die Preise sind sehr günstig (Hauptgericht ca. 30-50 Yuen Reis 3 Yuen). Die Portionen sind wie auf den Bildern. Sie sind ausreichend und dem Preis angemessen. Verschiedene Gerichte probiert. Alle sehr lecker. Kam deshalb öfters. Absolute Empfehlung.

Its population was 3,700,000 at the 2016 census whom 1,301,732 live in the built-up area made of 4 urban districts (Jiefang, Shanyang, Zhongzhan and Macun) and Bo'ai County being urbanized. Jiaozuo enjoys a humid subtropical climate with continental climate influences. Winters are cool and relatively dry while summers are hot and often rainy. Average temperature ranges from 0.3 °C in January to 27.5 °C in July. Extremes exist from -22.4 °C to 43.6 °C. Precipitation averages 659 mm.
An action-comedy combining elements from Sammo Hung's "Lucky Stars" movie series and Karl Maka's "Aces Go Places" series would have been incredible and potentially great. However, this movie did not meet that expectation, as it had no solid plot - just a bunch of silly, tasteless and goofy nonsensical humor one after the other, making the movie dull, repetitive and non-suspenseful.
On February 13, 2004, Yuntai Mountain as the fifth in the world, the third in the country China, was named the world's first World Geopark by UNESCO and caused attention at home and abroad. Meanwhile, Yuntaishan is also a national scenic spot, National Civilized Scenic Area, the first national AAAAA-level scenic spot, national natural heritage, national forest parks, national macaque nature reserve. Yuntain Mountain also has Asia's highest head drop waterfall.

An action-comedy combining elements from Sammo Hung's "Lucky Stars" movie series and Karl Maka's "Aces Go Places" series would have been incredible and potentially great. However, this movie did not meet that expectation, as it had no solid plot - just a bunch of silly, tasteless and goofy nonsensical humor one after the other, making the movie dull, repetitive and non-suspenseful.


So this has now become a regular on my circuit of restaurants. My brother was visiting me and I took him here to try the dumplings but more so to try the battered stuffed lotus root, they are similar to large thick slices of potato in batter that are served in chippies in Manchester where we grew up, also the mixed veg curry was amazing with fried potato, broccoli, mushrooms and carrot, this has become a must have. My most recent visit was with three other vegans, we ordered so much food the owner was worried we wouldn't finish it all, we did all but three steamed buns which we took away. The wheat gluten with veg is delicious, such a light tasty gravy. The walnut buns are almost like a pecan pie, the Buddha cakes are delicious 6 round green pastry cookies with sesame seeds and inside is taro or purple sweet potato. All our food for four people came to 369 rmb which is a bargain. My advice is to bring your own take away container and order more than you eat, you'll be glad to take away the leftovers and have them later. Also the staff are lovely and friendly.
Qingdao, also known as for its romanized name, Tsingtao, it is a city located in the east coast of China and the main city of the Shandong Province. The city features for being an important seaport, counting with the world’s longest sea bridge, the Jiaozhou Bay Bridge. It is famous for being home of the popular Chinese beer Tsingtao. Along with Shanghai, Beijing, Dalian and Hong Kong, has a relevant importance as a global financial centre. Given its temperate climate, Qingdao is popular among not only local tourists, also international visitors. Regarding its interesting places, you shouldn’t miss Laoshan Mountain, an important Taoist centre, Qingdao church, and some of its beautiful beaches and some of its vestiges regarding Japanese and German architecture in Ba Da Guan, located in the Western Shinan district.
Anyway, I decided to ask my mom and my grandmother about it and they told me a few legends. (I rewatched the episode "Alpha" too) All my mom and my grandmother told me was that the Wan Sheng Dhole was a type of dog and that it did die out due to hunting. It was a rare breed of dog with 5 toes and very unusual eyes. My grandmother believed that they were murderous men who had been cursed to walk the earth in the form of a dog…. Anyway, my mother told me to ask my grandfather about it (He is a Shinto Priest in Taiwan) I Realize this thread is almost a decade old now but I figured I might as well give some information incase anyone was interested.
Dr. Huiyuan Jiang M.D. IS an amazing Dr., JUST found out TODAY that he Is relocating. He has been a great Dr. to my son along his Journey, and IT’S amazing how God Works, IT’S like he kept him here this long, for our child, God Bless and we wish you well Dr. Huiyuan Jiang. I still remember the late night calls with my questions and you never turned me away; any time at night, and I will forever remember that AS I’m crying writing this to you, Good Luck And Farewell!
Among Huiyuan's many accomplishments, his devotional group probably had the most enduring influence on Chinese Buddhism. In 402 Huiyuan and 123 lay and clerical disciples gathered before an image of the Buddha Amitābha and made a collective vow to be reborn together in his Pure Land. Huiyuan's devotional group served as a model for the lay-based Buddhist societies of the mid-Tang and Song periods, the most well known of which is the White Lotus Society of the early twelfth century. This group claimed to take its name from that of Huiyuan's confraternity; modern scholarship, however, has shown the name to be of later origin. The deliberate evocation of Huiyuan's legacy some eight hundred years after his death, however, attests vividly to his enduring prestige in the Chinese Buddhist community. His influence continues to be acknowledged by the Pure Land traditions of both China and Japan, which have traditionally regarded Huiyuan as their founder and first patriarch.

Qingdao, also known as for its romanized name, Tsingtao, it is a city located in the east coast of China and the main city of the Shandong Province. The city features for being an important seaport, counting with the world’s longest sea bridge, the Jiaozhou Bay Bridge. It is famous for being home of the popular Chinese beer Tsingtao. Along with Shanghai, Beijing, Dalian and Hong Kong, has a relevant importance as a global financial centre. Given its temperate climate, Qingdao is popular among not only local tourists, also international visitors. Regarding its interesting places, you shouldn’t miss Laoshan Mountain, an important Taoist centre, Qingdao church, and some of its beautiful beaches and some of its vestiges regarding Japanese and German architecture in Ba Da Guan, located in the Western Shinan district.
HUIYUAN (334–416), more fully Shi Huiyuan or Lüshan Huiyuan, Chinese Buddhist monk. Born to a literati family named Jia in Yanmen (Shanxi province), Huiyuan went to Henan at the age of thirteen to study both the Confucian classics and the Laozi and Zhuangzi. When he was twenty he met the eminent Buddhist monk Dao'an (312–385), whose personality and explanation of the philosophy of the "perfection of wisdom" (Skt., prajñāpāramitā ) impressed him so much that he embraced Buddhism and became his disciple. He remained with Dao'an for twenty-four years, residing mostly at Xiangyang. In 378 the invading Qin army forced master and disciple to separate. Huiyuan went south and eventually settled on Mount Lü in Jiangxi, where one of his colleagues from his days in Xiangyang, Huiyong, interceded on his behalf to have the Donglin Monastery built for him around 384. He remained there until his death thirty years later.
Jiaozuo is noted for its blast furnaces and machine construction industries. The total GDP of the city in 2017 was 234.28 billion yuan, an increase of 7.4% over the previous year. Among them, the added value of the primary industry was 13.733 billion yuan, up 4.6%; the added value of the secondary industry was 13.841 billion yuan, up 6.7%; the added value of the tertiary industry was 81.143 billion yuan, up 9.1%. The per capita GDP reached 65,936 yuan. The three industrial structures changed from 6.4:59.3:34.3 of 2016 to 5.9:59.5:34.6.link
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On 3 September 2008, Atlantic Industries, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Coca-Cola Company, agreed to buy China Huiyuan Juice for HK$17.9 billion at HK$12.20 per share, three times more than its closing price of HK$4.14 on the previous day. Its shares closed at HK$10.94 on that day.[4] The proposed takeover was subject to anti-monopoly review by the Chinese Ministry of Commerce, which was scheduled to finish on 20 March 2009.[5] On 17 March, it was reported that Coca-Cola was considering abandoning the deal, as Chinese authorities insisted on relinquishing the Huiyuan brand name after acquisition.[6] On 18 March, the Ministry of Commerce disallowed the bid, citing market competition concerns.[7][8]

The Donglin Monastery soon became the most famous center of Buddhism in southern China and continued to be so for several centuries after Huiyuan's death. Much of this prestige derived from the high esteem in which Huiyuan was held by the courts of the Eastern Jin dynasty in the South and the Yao Qin dynasty in the North, and by local rulers, who regarded him as the bulwark and paragon of Buddhist virtue. Huiyuan was active as a scholar and proponent of Buddhism, improving its status in China by increasing the number of texts available in translation and by defending the religion against its opponents. He sent certain of his disciples west to gather scriptures, of which over two hundred were eventually translated. He was also involved in the activities of many translators, three of whom represented three important tendencies in Buddhism: Saṃghadeva (Abhidharma texts), Buddhabhadra (dhyāna texts), and Kumārajīva (Mādhyamika texts). In 404, in response to the anti-Buddhist policies of Huan Xuan, the usurper of the Eastern Jin, Huiyuan elaborated his position on church-state relations in his influential The Śraṃana Does Not Pay Homage to the Ruler. Here he argued that of the two groups in Buddhism, the laity and the clergy, the former is subject to temporal authority but not the latter, since its members had abandoned society for nonworldly ends.


In the year 404, Huiyuan wrote a treatise On Why Monks Do Not Bow Down Before Kings (沙門不敬王者論).[4] This book symbolized his efforts to assert the political independence of Buddhist clergy from the courts of monarchic rulers. At the same time, it was a religious and political text that aimed to convince monarchs and Confucian-minded ministers of state that followers of Buddhism were ultimately not subversive. He argued that Buddhists could make good subjects in a kingdom due to their beliefs in retribution of karma and the desire to be reborn in paradise. Despite the Buddhists' reputation of leaving their family behind for a monastic life, Huiyuan stated "those who rejoice in the Way of the Buddha invariably first serve their parents and obey their lords."[1]
I'll start very briefly with the negatives! I wasn't a fan of the decor (or lack of), nor did I enjoy ordering from an iPad (since when did speaking to a human become so challenging), & the menu was good but slightly mish mash...noodles next to pesto pasta for example. The expats outnumbered locals by far, you can read what you want into that. As for the food: yum! The fried lotus root was so good, sweet and sour 'pork' was delightful and the 'ribs' were incredible. You'd pay an arm and a leg for vegan food that good in the UK so I'm not complaining! However, I do have one comment. The food seemed to be designed for a Western pallet...by that I mean it reminded me of a Chinese takeaway you would get on a Saturday night while watching TV. Very sweet and not too spicy. Of course it's 10x better than that and cruelty free which is fab!!! But if you want something more authentic Chinese then go to Godly (not far from People's Square). If you have time then go to both and decide for yourself! If you can only go to one then my preference would be Godly.
Sun Min, wife of a Chinese businessman, was found guilty of insider trading in Huiyuan shares by the Market Misconduct Tribunal in Hong Kong. The businessman, Mo Feng, and Sun purchased 8.61 million shares in the company between 30 July and 29 August 2008, at between HK$3.78 and 4.66 (US$0.48–$0.60), then resold their shares HK$10.24–$11.12 (US$1.21–$1.43) each on 3–4 Sept. 2008, after Huiyuan's stock price had surged after the proposed takeover was announced. A profit of HK$55.1 million (US$7.09 million) was made from the trade.[9] Sun was convicted of having dealt in 3.13 million Huiyuan shares in August 2008[10] and was fined HK$20 million (US$2.56 million), the largest ever imposed for the crime in the territory.[11]
Huiyuan began studying the Zhuangzi and Laozi at a young age, as well as the teachings of Confucius. However, at the age of 21 he was converted in Hebei Province by the Buddhist Dao An, who was a Chinese disciple of a Kuchan missionary. Hearing the sermons of Dao An convinced Huiyuan to "leave the family" and embark on a life of Buddhist teachings.[1] Later, he became a patriarch of Donglin Temple (East Forest Temple) at Mount Lushan. His teachings were various, including the vinaya (戒律), meditation (禪法), abhidharma and Prajna or wisdom. Although Huiyuan did not take the initiative in establishing the relations with the secular world, he had contacts with court and gentry families. Huiyuan was on two occasions invited by the dictator Huan Xuan to take part in the discussions about the status of the clergy and Huiyuan defended the independence of the clergy. Members of the cultured classes came to live on Mount Lu as Huiyuan's lay disciples to take part in the religious life. Besides his teaching and interaction with lay followers of the Buddhist faith, he also upheld a learned correspondence with the monk Kumarajiva.[2]
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