Huiyuan also enjoyed enormous popularity among the gentry of South China, for it was to this group that he primarily directed his literary efforts. Some thirty of his works, in the form of letters, essays, prefaces, eulogies, or inscriptions, are extant. Unlike Dao'an, who primarily wrote commentaries for the Buddhist clergy, Huiyuan addressed issues that most concerned the gentry: rebirth, the immortality of the soul, the doctrine of karman, and the nature of the dharmakāya. His previous classical training made him successful in explaining these concepts in terms of the philosophical outlook of the Chinese elite, which at the time was dominated by xuanxue ("dark learning") speculations into the underlying source (ben ) of phenomena. That he never once quoted a Buddhist sūtra by name but made numerous allusions to the Confucian classics attests to his fervent desire to bring Buddhism into the mainstream of Chinese spiritual and intellectual life. Modern scholars have identified certain areas in which Huiyuan's understanding of important Buddhist concepts deviates from that of the Indian texts. They have attributed this both to his concern to present Buddhist notions in a form comprehensible to the Chinese, as in his postulation of a cosmic soul (shen ) as a means of explaining the process of rebirth, or to his frank inability in some instances to master the subtleties of Buddhist doctrine. This is particularly evident in his treatment of the Mādhyamika concepts introduced into China by Kumārajīva. Huiyuan's correspondence with this, perhaps the greatest of all Buddhist translators, is one of our richest sources of information on the development of Buddhist thought in fifth-century China.

Jiaozuo (Chinese: 焦作; pinyin: Jiāozuò [tɕjáu.tswô]; postal: Tsiaotso) is a prefecture-level city in northern Henan province, China. Sitting on the northern bank of the Yellow River, it borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to the south, Xinxiang to the east, Jiyuan to the west, Luoyang to the southwest, and the province of Shanxi to the north.Jiaozuo is one of the core cities of the Central Plains urban agglomeration and a regional central city in the Jin-Yu border area.link


This was some of the most delicious food I have ever eaten. 6 months later and my kids are still talking about how good it was. We had a huge variety of dishes in the two times we went here. The pesto noodles were a welcome change from heavier Asian options and my daughter truly enjoy her vegan pork chop. We are a little of everything but the walnut buns were decidedly the best food we ever tasted. My life goal is to find a recipe to make these at home. Don’t miss out on this place. Its truly wonderful.
Name: 慧缘素食坊, address 黄浦区淮海东路49号(近地铁8号线大世界站). Spacious interior with Wi-Fi. Groups of 6-12 can be served at a round table on 2nd floor. Orders over a certain amount (500RMB at Jul 2019) can be served in private room. Directions: take exit 2 from the station (next to Starbucks), then take the second left. Restaurant is on the RHS. Note: Due to issues with our map providers in China the marker may not be accurate. Open Mon-Sun 11:00am-9:00pm. Last orders at 8:30pm.
The Donglin Monastery soon became the most famous center of Buddhism in southern China and continued to be so for several centuries after Huiyuan's death. Much of this prestige derived from the high esteem in which Huiyuan was held by the courts of the Eastern Jin dynasty in the South and the Yao Qin dynasty in the North, and by local rulers, who regarded him as the bulwark and paragon of Buddhist virtue. Huiyuan was active as a scholar and proponent of Buddhism, improving its status in China by increasing the number of texts available in translation and by defending the religion against its opponents. He sent certain of his disciples west to gather scriptures, of which over two hundred were eventually translated. He was also involved in the activities of many translators, three of whom represented three important tendencies in Buddhism: Saṃghadeva (Abhidharma texts), Buddhabhadra (dhyāna texts), and Kumārajīva (Mādhyamika texts). In 404, in response to the anti-Buddhist policies of Huan Xuan, the usurper of the Eastern Jin, Huiyuan elaborated his position on church-state relations in his influential The Śraṃana Does Not Pay Homage to the Ruler. Here he argued that of the two groups in Buddhism, the laity and the clergy, the former is subject to temporal authority but not the latter, since its members had abandoned society for nonworldly ends.
1850. Around this year, the Chinese Wanshang Dhole wild dog  is believed to become extinct. The dog, a scavanger, is also the basis for Chinese myth  and legend which calls it a trickster dog, able to open doors, steal wives and disappear  into thin air. The Wangshang Dhole may also be related to a form of Chinese werewolf, which does not become extinct.
Its population was 3,700,000 at the 2016 census whom 1,301,732 live in the built-up area made of 4 urban districts (Jiefang, Shanyang, Zhongzhan and Macun) and Bo'ai County being urbanized. Jiaozuo enjoys a humid subtropical climate with continental climate influences. Winters are cool and relatively dry while summers are hot and often rainy. Average temperature ranges from 0.3 °C in January to 27.5 °C in July. Extremes exist from -22.4 °C to 43.6 °C. Precipitation averages 659 mm.
Categories: 1956 birthsBusinesspeople in the oil industryBusinesspeople from ShenyangLiving peopleMembers of the 19th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaMembers of the 18th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaAlternate members of the 17th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaPoliticians from ShenyangPeople's Republic of China politicians from LiaoningCommunist Party of China politicians from LiaoningMembers of the Chinese Academy of EngineeringGovernment ministers of the People's Republic of ChinaPetroleum engineersEngineers from Liaoning
So this has now become a regular on my circuit of restaurants. My brother was visiting me and I took him here to try the dumplings but more so to try the battered stuffed lotus root, they are similar to large thick slices of potato in batter that are served in chippies in Manchester where we grew up, also the mixed veg curry was amazing with fried potato, broccoli, mushrooms and carrot, this has become a must have. My most recent visit was with three other vegans, we ordered so much food the owner was worried we wouldn't finish it all, we did all but three steamed buns which we took away. The wheat gluten with veg is delicious, such a light tasty gravy. The walnut buns are almost like a pecan pie, the Buddha cakes are delicious 6 round green pastry cookies with sesame seeds and inside is taro or purple sweet potato. All our food for four people came to 369 rmb which is a bargain. My advice is to bring your own take away container and order more than you eat, you'll be glad to take away the leftovers and have them later. Also the staff are lovely and friendly.
Name: 慧缘素食坊, address 黄浦区淮海东路49号(近地铁8号线大世界站). Spacious interior with Wi-Fi. Groups of 6-12 can be served at a round table on 2nd floor. Orders over a certain amount (500RMB at Jul 2019) can be served in private room. Directions: take exit 2 from the station (next to Starbucks), then take the second left. Restaurant is on the RHS. Note: Due to issues with our map providers in China the marker may not be accurate. Open Mon-Sun 11:00am-9:00pm. Last orders at 8:30pm.

The best historical treatment of Huiyuan, including translation of his biography, can be found in Erik Zürcher's The Buddhist Conquest of China (Leiden, 1959), pp. 204–253. For an overview of Huiyuan's thought, with emphasis on his deviation from the original Indian position, there is Walter Liebenthal's "Shih Hui-yüan's Buddhism as Set Forth in His Writings," Journal of the American Oriental Society 70 (1950): 243–259. Huiyuan's major essay, The Śraṃana Does Not Pay Homage to the Ruler (Shamen bu jing wangzhe lun ), is fully translated by Leon Hurvitz in "'Render unto Caesar' in Early Chinese Buddhism," in Liebenthal Festschrift, "Sino-Indian Studies," vol. 5, pts. 3–4, edited by Roy Kshitis (Santiniketan, 1957), pp. 80–114. An assessment of Huiyuan's understanding of Mādhyamika philosophy, plus translation of his correspondence with Kumārajīva and a list of all of his extant writings with textual references, can be found in Richard Robinson's Early Mādhyamika in India and China (Madison, Wis., 1967), pp. 96–114, 181–205. Eon Kenkyū, 2 vols., edited by Kimura Eiichi (Kyoto, 1960–1962), is the most thorough work on this figure; it includes studies on Huiyuan, his texts and translations.

This was some of the most delicious food I have ever eaten. 6 months later and my kids are still talking about how good it was. We had a huge variety of dishes in the two times we went here. The pesto noodles were a welcome change from heavier Asian options and my daughter truly enjoy her vegan pork chop. We are a little of everything but the walnut buns were decidedly the best food we ever tasted. My life goal is to find a recipe to make these at home. Don’t miss out on this place. Its truly wonderful.
Its population was 3,700,000 at the 2016 census whom 1,301,732 live in the built-up area made of 4 urban districts (Jiefang, Shanyang, Zhongzhan and Macun) and Bo'ai County being urbanized. Jiaozuo enjoys a humid subtropical climate with continental climate influences. Winters are cool and relatively dry while summers are hot and often rainy. Average temperature ranges from 0.3 °C in January to 27.5 °C in July. Extremes exist from -22.4 °C to 43.6 °C. Precipitation averages 659 mm.
Huiyuan also enjoyed enormous popularity among the gentry of South China, for it was to this group that he primarily directed his literary efforts. Some thirty of his works, in the form of letters, essays, prefaces, eulogies, or inscriptions, are extant. Unlike Dao'an, who primarily wrote commentaries for the Buddhist clergy, Huiyuan addressed issues that most concerned the gentry: rebirth, the immortality of the soul, the doctrine of karman, and the nature of the dharmakāya. His previous classical training made him successful in explaining these concepts in terms of the philosophical outlook of the Chinese elite, which at the time was dominated by xuanxue ("dark learning") speculations into the underlying source (ben ) of phenomena. That he never once quoted a Buddhist sūtra by name but made numerous allusions to the Confucian classics attests to his fervent desire to bring Buddhism into the mainstream of Chinese spiritual and intellectual life. Modern scholars have identified certain areas in which Huiyuan's understanding of important Buddhist concepts deviates from that of the Indian texts. They have attributed this both to his concern to present Buddhist notions in a form comprehensible to the Chinese, as in his postulation of a cosmic soul (shen ) as a means of explaining the process of rebirth, or to his frank inability in some instances to master the subtleties of Buddhist doctrine. This is particularly evident in his treatment of the Mādhyamika concepts introduced into China by Kumārajīva. Huiyuan's correspondence with this, perhaps the greatest of all Buddhist translators, is one of our richest sources of information on the development of Buddhist thought in fifth-century China.

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Das kleine Restaurant bietet Platz für ca. 20-30 Leute. Die Einrichtung ist einfach, aber sauber. Man bestellt via Tablet mit bebilderten Gerichten. Die Auswahl ist groß, die Preise sind sehr günstig (Hauptgericht ca. 30-50 Yuen Reis 3 Yuen). Die Portionen sind wie auf den Bildern. Sie sind ausreichend und dem Preis angemessen. Verschiedene Gerichte probiert. Alle sehr lecker. Kam deshalb öfters. Absolute Empfehlung.
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