Qingyuan is a major economic and transportation hub. The Beijing–Guangzhou Railway, National Highways 106 and 107, and the Bei or North River cross through the city. The maritime infrastructure in Qingyuan plays a vital role in transporting goods to other regional centers in Guangdong, Hong Kong, and Macao. The major ports are Qingyuan Port, Yingde Port, Lianzhou Port, and Yangshan Port.

Name: 慧缘素食坊, address 黄浦区淮海东路49号(近地铁8号线大世界站). Spacious interior with Wi-Fi. Groups of 6-12 can be served at a round table on 2nd floor. Orders over a certain amount (500RMB at Jul 2019) can be served in private room. Directions: take exit 2 from the station (next to Starbucks), then take the second left. Restaurant is on the RHS. Note: Due to issues with our map providers in China the marker may not be accurate. Open Mon-Sun 11:00am-9:00pm. Last orders at 8:30pm.

Das kleine Restaurant bietet Platz für ca. 20-30 Leute. Die Einrichtung ist einfach, aber sauber. Man bestellt via Tablet mit bebilderten Gerichten. Die Auswahl ist groß, die Preise sind sehr günstig (Hauptgericht ca. 30-50 Yuen Reis 3 Yuen). Die Portionen sind wie auf den Bildern. Sie sind ausreichend und dem Preis angemessen. Verschiedene Gerichte probiert. Alle sehr lecker. Kam deshalb öfters. Absolute Empfehlung.
Das kleine Restaurant bietet Platz für ca. 20-30 Leute. Die Einrichtung ist einfach, aber sauber. Man bestellt via Tablet mit bebilderten Gerichten. Die Auswahl ist groß, die Preise sind sehr günstig (Hauptgericht ca. 30-50 Yuen Reis 3 Yuen). Die Portionen sind wie auf den Bildern. Sie sind ausreichend und dem Preis angemessen. Verschiedene Gerichte probiert. Alle sehr lecker. Kam deshalb öfters. Absolute Empfehlung.
The Donglin Monastery soon became the most famous center of Buddhism in southern China and continued to be so for several centuries after Huiyuan's death. Much of this prestige derived from the high esteem in which Huiyuan was held by the courts of the Eastern Jin dynasty in the South and the Yao Qin dynasty in the North, and by local rulers, who regarded him as the bulwark and paragon of Buddhist virtue. Huiyuan was active as a scholar and proponent of Buddhism, improving its status in China by increasing the number of texts available in translation and by defending the religion against its opponents. He sent certain of his disciples west to gather scriptures, of which over two hundred were eventually translated. He was also involved in the activities of many translators, three of whom represented three important tendencies in Buddhism: Saṃghadeva (Abhidharma texts), Buddhabhadra (dhyāna texts), and Kumārajīva (Mādhyamika texts). In 404, in response to the anti-Buddhist policies of Huan Xuan, the usurper of the Eastern Jin, Huiyuan elaborated his position on church-state relations in his influential The Śraṃana Does Not Pay Homage to the Ruler. Here he argued that of the two groups in Buddhism, the laity and the clergy, the former is subject to temporal authority but not the latter, since its members had abandoned society for nonworldly ends.
The best historical treatment of Huiyuan, including translation of his biography, can be found in Erik Zürcher's The Buddhist Conquest of China (Leiden, 1959), pp. 204–253. For an overview of Huiyuan's thought, with emphasis on his deviation from the original Indian position, there is Walter Liebenthal's "Shih Hui-yüan's Buddhism as Set Forth in His Writings," Journal of the American Oriental Society 70 (1950): 243–259. Huiyuan's major essay, The Śraṃana Does Not Pay Homage to the Ruler (Shamen bu jing wangzhe lun ), is fully translated by Leon Hurvitz in "'Render unto Caesar' in Early Chinese Buddhism," in Liebenthal Festschrift, "Sino-Indian Studies," vol. 5, pts. 3–4, edited by Roy Kshitis (Santiniketan, 1957), pp. 80–114. An assessment of Huiyuan's understanding of Mādhyamika philosophy, plus translation of his correspondence with Kumārajīva and a list of all of his extant writings with textual references, can be found in Richard Robinson's Early Mādhyamika in India and China (Madison, Wis., 1967), pp. 96–114, 181–205. Eon Kenkyū, 2 vols., edited by Kimura Eiichi (Kyoto, 1960–1962), is the most thorough work on this figure; it includes studies on Huiyuan, his texts and translations.

I can't believe I've only just tried this place after 2 years being in Shanghai, if you've not been yet then you're missing out. The huge Happy Cow banner was a most welcoming sign, we were greeted as we entered and brought an electronic menu straight away. The choice was vast, some dishes looked similar to Super Vegan so we went for different items. The prices were really reasonable, we had 8 items for 208rmb. The battered stuffed lotus root is a favourite of mine & this was perfect, with tiny chopped peppers to decorate. The boiled dumplings were really good with the peanut/sesame dipping sauce. I've had better spare ribs, they were just a bit chewy & not that tasty. The green beans were good, the corn cake good if slightly weird & the walnut buns were delicious, with a treacle like flavour. I definitely want to go back soon to try more of their dishes. We spoke with the owner/manager Fang who was excited we were from Happy Cow, I gave him his excellent reviews sticker & bunches of the smaller stickers, he was delighted.
Three Qing Dynasty novels are collectively known as the Romance of Di Qing and are attributed to Li Yutang. The central character in all 3 novels is Di Qing. The first one is originally titled "Pavilion of Ten Thousand Flowers" (萬花樓); the second one is titled "Five Tigers Conquering the West" (五虎征西) and the last one is titled "Five Tigers Conquering the South" (五虎平南). The novels also prominently feature Yang Zongbao from the Yang clan and Bao Zheng as the protagonists.

I came here three days in a row. Food is great, everything I had was too sweet though, the reason might be Shanghai itself. They have lots of substitute for any kind of meat. Staff is friendly, they don't speak English but they have an English menu on tablet PC. Must be aware, menu is a bit deceptive, portions look so small that makes you feel like you have to order multiple options. Portions are fullfilling.


On 3 September 2008, Atlantic Industries, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Coca-Cola Company, agreed to buy China Huiyuan Juice for HK$17.9 billion at HK$12.20 per share, three times more than its closing price of HK$4.14 on the previous day. Its shares closed at HK$10.94 on that day.[4] The proposed takeover was subject to anti-monopoly review by the Chinese Ministry of Commerce, which was scheduled to finish on 20 March 2009.[5] On 17 March, it was reported that Coca-Cola was considering abandoning the deal, as Chinese authorities insisted on relinquishing the Huiyuan brand name after acquisition.[6] On 18 March, the Ministry of Commerce disallowed the bid, citing market competition concerns.[7][8]

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