Jiaozuo (Chinese: 焦作; pinyin: Jiāozuò [tɕjáu.tswô]; postal: Tsiaotso) is a prefecture-level city in northern Henan province, China. Sitting on the northern bank of the Yellow River, it borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to the south, Xinxiang to the east, Jiyuan to the west, Luoyang to the southwest, and the province of Shanxi to the north.Jiaozuo is one of the core cities of the Central Plains urban agglomeration and a regional central city in the Jin-Yu border area.link
Huiyuan also enjoyed enormous popularity among the gentry of South China, for it was to this group that he primarily directed his literary efforts. Some thirty of his works, in the form of letters, essays, prefaces, eulogies, or inscriptions, are extant. Unlike Dao'an, who primarily wrote commentaries for the Buddhist clergy, Huiyuan addressed issues that most concerned the gentry: rebirth, the immortality of the soul, the doctrine of karman, and the nature of the dharmakāya. His previous classical training made him successful in explaining these concepts in terms of the philosophical outlook of the Chinese elite, which at the time was dominated by xuanxue ("dark learning") speculations into the underlying source (ben ) of phenomena. That he never once quoted a Buddhist sūtra by name but made numerous allusions to the Confucian classics attests to his fervent desire to bring Buddhism into the mainstream of Chinese spiritual and intellectual life. Modern scholars have identified certain areas in which Huiyuan's understanding of important Buddhist concepts deviates from that of the Indian texts. They have attributed this both to his concern to present Buddhist notions in a form comprehensible to the Chinese, as in his postulation of a cosmic soul (shen ) as a means of explaining the process of rebirth, or to his frank inability in some instances to master the subtleties of Buddhist doctrine. This is particularly evident in his treatment of the Mādhyamika concepts introduced into China by Kumārajīva. Huiyuan's correspondence with this, perhaps the greatest of all Buddhist translators, is one of our richest sources of information on the development of Buddhist thought in fifth-century China.
Das kleine Restaurant bietet Platz für ca. 20-30 Leute. Die Einrichtung ist einfach, aber sauber. Man bestellt via Tablet mit bebilderten Gerichten. Die Auswahl ist groß, die Preise sind sehr günstig (Hauptgericht ca. 30-50 Yuen Reis 3 Yuen). Die Portionen sind wie auf den Bildern. Sie sind ausreichend und dem Preis angemessen. Verschiedene Gerichte probiert. Alle sehr lecker. Kam deshalb öfters. Absolute Empfehlung.
Qingdao, also known as for its romanized name, Tsingtao, it is a city located in the east coast of China and the main city of the Shandong Province. The city features for being an important seaport, counting with the world’s longest sea bridge, the Jiaozhou Bay Bridge. It is famous for being home of the popular Chinese beer Tsingtao. Along with Shanghai, Beijing, Dalian and Hong Kong, has a relevant importance as a global financial centre. Given its temperate climate, Qingdao is popular among not only local tourists, also international visitors. Regarding its interesting places, you shouldn’t miss Laoshan Mountain, an important Taoist centre, Qingdao church, and some of its beautiful beaches and some of its vestiges regarding Japanese and German architecture in Ba Da Guan, located in the Western Shinan district.
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Qingdao, also known as for its romanized name, Tsingtao, it is a city located in the east coast of China and the main city of the Shandong Province. The city features for being an important seaport, counting with the world’s longest sea bridge, the Jiaozhou Bay Bridge. It is famous for being home of the popular Chinese beer Tsingtao. Along with Shanghai, Beijing, Dalian and Hong Kong, has a relevant importance as a global financial centre. Given its temperate climate, Qingdao is popular among not only local tourists, also international visitors. Regarding its interesting places, you shouldn’t miss Laoshan Mountain, an important Taoist centre, Qingdao church, and some of its beautiful beaches and some of its vestiges regarding Japanese and German architecture in Ba Da Guan, located in the Western Shinan district.
Huiyuan also enjoyed enormous popularity among the gentry of South China, for it was to this group that he primarily directed his literary efforts. Some thirty of his works, in the form of letters, essays, prefaces, eulogies, or inscriptions, are extant. Unlike Dao'an, who primarily wrote commentaries for the Buddhist clergy, Huiyuan addressed issues that most concerned the gentry: rebirth, the immortality of the soul, the doctrine of karman, and the nature of the dharmakāya. His previous classical training made him successful in explaining these concepts in terms of the philosophical outlook of the Chinese elite, which at the time was dominated by xuanxue ("dark learning") speculations into the underlying source (ben ) of phenomena. That he never once quoted a Buddhist sūtra by name but made numerous allusions to the Confucian classics attests to his fervent desire to bring Buddhism into the mainstream of Chinese spiritual and intellectual life. Modern scholars have identified certain areas in which Huiyuan's understanding of important Buddhist concepts deviates from that of the Indian texts. They have attributed this both to his concern to present Buddhist notions in a form comprehensible to the Chinese, as in his postulation of a cosmic soul (shen ) as a means of explaining the process of rebirth, or to his frank inability in some instances to master the subtleties of Buddhist doctrine. This is particularly evident in his treatment of the Mādhyamika concepts introduced into China by Kumārajīva. Huiyuan's correspondence with this, perhaps the greatest of all Buddhist translators, is one of our richest sources of information on the development of Buddhist thought in fifth-century China.
Huiyuan began studying the Zhuangzi and Laozi at a young age, as well as the teachings of Confucius. However, at the age of 21 he was converted in Hebei Province by the Buddhist Dao An, who was a Chinese disciple of a Kuchan missionary. Hearing the sermons of Dao An convinced Huiyuan to "leave the family" and embark on a life of Buddhist teachings.[1] Later, he became a patriarch of Donglin Temple (East Forest Temple) at Mount Lushan. His teachings were various, including the vinaya (戒律), meditation (禪法), abhidharma and Prajna or wisdom. Although Huiyuan did not take the initiative in establishing the relations with the secular world, he had contacts with court and gentry families. Huiyuan was on two occasions invited by the dictator Huan Xuan to take part in the discussions about the status of the clergy and Huiyuan defended the independence of the clergy. Members of the cultured classes came to live on Mount Lu as Huiyuan's lay disciples to take part in the religious life. Besides his teaching and interaction with lay followers of the Buddhist faith, he also upheld a learned correspondence with the monk Kumarajiva.[2]

China Huiyuan Juice Group Limited (Chinese: 中国汇源果汁集团有限公司; pinyin: Zhōngguó Huìyuán Guǒzhī Jítuán Yǒuxiàn Gōngsī) (SEHK: 1886), established in 1992 and headquartered in Beijing, is the largest privately owned juice producer in China.[1] It is engaged in the manufacture and sales of juice and other beverage products. Its products include fruit juice and vegetable juice, nectars, bottled water, tea, and dairy drinks.[2]
Its population was 3,700,000 at the 2016 census whom 1,301,732 live in the built-up area made of 4 urban districts (Jiefang, Shanyang, Zhongzhan and Macun) and Bo'ai County being urbanized. Jiaozuo enjoys a humid subtropical climate with continental climate influences. Winters are cool and relatively dry while summers are hot and often rainy. Average temperature ranges from 0.3 °C in January to 27.5 °C in July. Extremes exist from -22.4 °C to 43.6 °C. Precipitation averages 659 mm.
Di Qing was born to a poor family in Xihe, Fenzhou (汾州西河; present-day Fenyang, Shanxi). He sported tattoos on his face and excelled in mounted archery. In 1038, during the reign of Emperor Renzong of Song, Di Qing was appointed as Commander (指揮使) of Yanzhou (延州; covering parts of present-day Shaanxi). He participated in the war between Song and Western Xia. Each time he went to war, he would don a bronze mask and let his hair run wild and disheveled, charging onto the battlefield. Di Qing was known to be close to Song ministers such as Yin Zhu (尹洙), Han Qi (韓琦) and Fan Zhongyan. Fan Zhongyan once presented Di Qing a copy of the Zuo Zhuan and advised him to read. Di Qing took up scholarly pursuits and became a versed military strategist. He was later promoted to Assistant Commissioner of the Bureau of Military Affairs (樞密副使) for his contributions. Di Qing participated in a total of 25 battles in his lifetime. Of these battles, he was best known for his night raid on Kunlun Pass on the 15th day of the first lunar month in 1053. He died at age 48.
I'll start very briefly with the negatives! I wasn't a fan of the decor (or lack of), nor did I enjoy ordering from an iPad (since when did speaking to a human become so challenging), & the menu was good but slightly mish mash...noodles next to pesto pasta for example. The expats outnumbered locals by far, you can read what you want into that. As for the food: yum! The fried lotus root was so good, sweet and sour 'pork' was delightful and the 'ribs' were incredible. You'd pay an arm and a leg for vegan food that good in the UK so I'm not complaining! However, I do have one comment. The food seemed to be designed for a Western pallet...by that I mean it reminded me of a Chinese takeaway you would get on a Saturday night while watching TV. Very sweet and not too spicy. Of course it's 10x better than that and cruelty free which is fab!!! But if you want something more authentic Chinese then go to Godly (not far from People's Square). If you have time then go to both and decide for yourself! If you can only go to one then my preference would be Godly.

Di Qing was born to a poor family in Xihe, Fenzhou (汾州西河; present-day Fenyang, Shanxi). He sported tattoos on his face and excelled in mounted archery. In 1038, during the reign of Emperor Renzong of Song, Di Qing was appointed as Commander (指揮使) of Yanzhou (延州; covering parts of present-day Shaanxi). He participated in the war between Song and Western Xia. Each time he went to war, he would don a bronze mask and let his hair run wild and disheveled, charging onto the battlefield. Di Qing was known to be close to Song ministers such as Yin Zhu (尹洙), Han Qi (韓琦) and Fan Zhongyan. Fan Zhongyan once presented Di Qing a copy of the Zuo Zhuan and advised him to read. Di Qing took up scholarly pursuits and became a versed military strategist. He was later promoted to Assistant Commissioner of the Bureau of Military Affairs (樞密副使) for his contributions. Di Qing participated in a total of 25 battles in his lifetime. Of these battles, he was best known for his night raid on Kunlun Pass on the 15th day of the first lunar month in 1053. He died at age 48.
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