Henan Polytechnic University (HPU)[1], with a history of nearly 100 years, is the first mining university in Chinese history. Its former is Jiaozuo Coal Mining School which was established by the British Syndicate Co. Ltd., in 1909. It has changed its names several times in the course of development, namely, FuZhong Coal Mining University, Jiaozuo Private Institute of Technology, North-west Institute of Technology, Jiaozuo National Institute of Technology, Jiaozuo Mining Institute and Jiaozuo Institute of Technology. The University resumed its name of Henan Polytechnic University in 2004.
Qingyuan's administrative area ranges in latitude from 23° 26' 56" to 25° 11' 40" N, and in longitude from 111° 55' 17" to 113° 55' 34" E;[1] its urban area is located just north of the Tropic of Cancer, about 60 km (37 mi) from the urban area of Guangzhou and 200 km (120 mi) from both Hong Kong and Macau. Its area of over 19,000 km2 (7,300 sq mi) accounts for 10.6% of the total provincial area.[1] Qingyuan contains part of the southern Nan Ling, and more than half of the area is mountainous, and elevations increase from southeast to northwest. Bordering prefectures are Guangzhou and Foshan to the southeast, Zhaoqing to the southwest, Shaoguan to the north and northeast, Hezhou (Guangxi) to the west, and Yongzhou and Chenzhou (Hunan) to the north.[1]
Huiyuan (Chinese: 慧遠; Wade–Giles: Hui-yüan; 334–416 AD) was a Chinese Buddhist teacher who founded Donglin Temple on Mount Lushan in Jiangxi province and wrote the text On Why Monks Do Not Bow Down Before Kings in 404 AD. He was born in Shanxi province but after a long life of Buddhist teaching he wound up in Jiangxi province, where he died in 416. Although he was born in the north, he moved south to live within the bounds of the Eastern Jin Dynasty.
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It’s super easy to find, and there’s a clear Happy Cow sign on the window. I had a fried mushroom dish which was super yummy. Unfortunately it came out way sooner than the other two dishes I ordered, making 1. me almost finished with them and 2. them cold by the time the other two dishes came out. The food is very, very fresh. The next dish that arrived were the walnut buns (dim sum section of menu), which were slightly sweet and pleasant. The next dish that came out were steamed dumplings/jiaozi, that arrived piping hot. They were good, but really filling, so you should be fairly hungry when eating this dish if you’re by yourself. The problem with this dish was with the sauce that came with it, which I can’t even call sauce; it was just melted and very greasy sesame seed butter without any flavor at all. The service was really warm and friendly here, so I’d definitely come back to try more dishes, and bring someone with me next time. They have an iPad menu that has some English, and ordering is pretty easy.
Qingyuan's administrative area ranges in latitude from 23° 26' 56" to 25° 11' 40" N, and in longitude from 111° 55' 17" to 113° 55' 34" E;[1] its urban area is located just north of the Tropic of Cancer, about 60 km (37 mi) from the urban area of Guangzhou and 200 km (120 mi) from both Hong Kong and Macau. Its area of over 19,000 km2 (7,300 sq mi) accounts for 10.6% of the total provincial area.[1] Qingyuan contains part of the southern Nan Ling, and more than half of the area is mountainous, and elevations increase from southeast to northwest. Bordering prefectures are Guangzhou and Foshan to the southeast, Zhaoqing to the southwest, Shaoguan to the north and northeast, Hezhou (Guangxi) to the west, and Yongzhou and Chenzhou (Hunan) to the north.[1]
ok so i was watchin season 6 of the Xfiles...and i was watching 1 episode about a rare dog... called the Wanshang Dhole. now they say its an chinese dog of some kind...but being a TV show i dont know if it acually true or not. now im chinese so it interests me even more...i tried to google it, but all i came up with is just stuff about the episode, nothing about the atual dog.
Huiyuan also enjoyed enormous popularity among the gentry of South China, for it was to this group that he primarily directed his literary efforts. Some thirty of his works, in the form of letters, essays, prefaces, eulogies, or inscriptions, are extant. Unlike Dao'an, who primarily wrote commentaries for the Buddhist clergy, Huiyuan addressed issues that most concerned the gentry: rebirth, the immortality of the soul, the doctrine of karman, and the nature of the dharmakāya. His previous classical training made him successful in explaining these concepts in terms of the philosophical outlook of the Chinese elite, which at the time was dominated by xuanxue ("dark learning") speculations into the underlying source (ben ) of phenomena. That he never once quoted a Buddhist sūtra by name but made numerous allusions to the Confucian classics attests to his fervent desire to bring Buddhism into the mainstream of Chinese spiritual and intellectual life. Modern scholars have identified certain areas in which Huiyuan's understanding of important Buddhist concepts deviates from that of the Indian texts. They have attributed this both to his concern to present Buddhist notions in a form comprehensible to the Chinese, as in his postulation of a cosmic soul (shen ) as a means of explaining the process of rebirth, or to his frank inability in some instances to master the subtleties of Buddhist doctrine. This is particularly evident in his treatment of the Mādhyamika concepts introduced into China by Kumārajīva. Huiyuan's correspondence with this, perhaps the greatest of all Buddhist translators, is one of our richest sources of information on the development of Buddhist thought in fifth-century China.
Anyway, I decided to ask my mom and my grandmother about it and they told me a few legends. (I rewatched the episode "Alpha" too) All my mom and my grandmother told me was that the Wan Sheng Dhole was a type of dog and that it did die out due to hunting. It was a rare breed of dog with 5 toes and very unusual eyes. My grandmother believed that they were murderous men who had been cursed to walk the earth in the form of a dog…. Anyway, my mother told me to ask my grandfather about it (He is a Shinto Priest in Taiwan) I Realize this thread is almost a decade old now but I figured I might as well give some information incase anyone was interested.
This was some of the most delicious food I have ever eaten. 6 months later and my kids are still talking about how good it was. We had a huge variety of dishes in the two times we went here. The pesto noodles were a welcome change from heavier Asian options and my daughter truly enjoy her vegan pork chop. We are a little of everything but the walnut buns were decidedly the best food we ever tasted. My life goal is to find a recipe to make these at home. Don’t miss out on this place. Its truly wonderful.
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