HUIYUAN (334–416), more fully Shi Huiyuan or Lüshan Huiyuan, Chinese Buddhist monk. Born to a literati family named Jia in Yanmen (Shanxi province), Huiyuan went to Henan at the age of thirteen to study both the Confucian classics and the Laozi and Zhuangzi. When he was twenty he met the eminent Buddhist monk Dao'an (312–385), whose personality and explanation of the philosophy of the "perfection of wisdom" (Skt., prajñāpāramitā ) impressed him so much that he embraced Buddhism and became his disciple. He remained with Dao'an for twenty-four years, residing mostly at Xiangyang. In 378 the invading Qin army forced master and disciple to separate. Huiyuan went south and eventually settled on Mount Lü in Jiangxi, where one of his colleagues from his days in Xiangyang, Huiyong, interceded on his behalf to have the Donglin Monastery built for him around 384. He remained there until his death thirty years later.
Sun Min, wife of a Chinese businessman, was found guilty of insider trading in Huiyuan shares by the Market Misconduct Tribunal in Hong Kong. The businessman, Mo Feng, and Sun purchased 8.61 million shares in the company between 30 July and 29 August 2008, at between HK$3.78 and 4.66 (US$0.48–$0.60), then resold their shares HK$10.24–$11.12 (US$1.21–$1.43) each on 3–4 Sept. 2008, after Huiyuan's stock price had surged after the proposed takeover was announced. A profit of HK$55.1 million (US$7.09 million) was made from the trade.[9] Sun was convicted of having dealt in 3.13 million Huiyuan shares in August 2008[10] and was fined HK$20 million (US$2.56 million), the largest ever imposed for the crime in the territory.[11]
I'll start very briefly with the negatives! I wasn't a fan of the decor (or lack of), nor did I enjoy ordering from an iPad (since when did speaking to a human become so challenging), & the menu was good but slightly mish mash...noodles next to pesto pasta for example. The expats outnumbered locals by far, you can read what you want into that. As for the food: yum! The fried lotus root was so good, sweet and sour 'pork' was delightful and the 'ribs' were incredible. You'd pay an arm and a leg for vegan food that good in the UK so I'm not complaining! However, I do have one comment. The food seemed to be designed for a Western pallet...by that I mean it reminded me of a Chinese takeaway you would get on a Saturday night while watching TV. Very sweet and not too spicy. Of course it's 10x better than that and cruelty free which is fab!!! But if you want something more authentic Chinese then go to Godly (not far from People's Square). If you have time then go to both and decide for yourself! If you can only go to one then my preference would be Godly.
I'll start very briefly with the negatives! I wasn't a fan of the decor (or lack of), nor did I enjoy ordering from an iPad (since when did speaking to a human become so challenging), & the menu was good but slightly mish mash...noodles next to pesto pasta for example. The expats outnumbered locals by far, you can read what you want into that. As for the food: yum! The fried lotus root was so good, sweet and sour 'pork' was delightful and the 'ribs' were incredible. You'd pay an arm and a leg for vegan food that good in the UK so I'm not complaining! However, I do have one comment. The food seemed to be designed for a Western pallet...by that I mean it reminded me of a Chinese takeaway you would get on a Saturday night while watching TV. Very sweet and not too spicy. Of course it's 10x better than that and cruelty free which is fab!!! But if you want something more authentic Chinese then go to Godly (not far from People's Square). If you have time then go to both and decide for yourself! If you can only go to one then my preference would be Godly.
It’s super easy to find, and there’s a clear Happy Cow sign on the window. I had a fried mushroom dish which was super yummy. Unfortunately it came out way sooner than the other two dishes I ordered, making 1. me almost finished with them and 2. them cold by the time the other two dishes came out. The food is very, very fresh. The next dish that arrived were the walnut buns (dim sum section of menu), which were slightly sweet and pleasant. The next dish that came out were steamed dumplings/jiaozi, that arrived piping hot. They were good, but really filling, so you should be fairly hungry when eating this dish if you’re by yourself. The problem with this dish was with the sauce that came with it, which I can’t even call sauce; it was just melted and very greasy sesame seed butter without any flavor at all. The service was really warm and friendly here, so I’d definitely come back to try more dishes, and bring someone with me next time. They have an iPad menu that has some English, and ordering is pretty easy.
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