It’s super easy to find, and there’s a clear Happy Cow sign on the window. I had a fried mushroom dish which was super yummy. Unfortunately it came out way sooner than the other two dishes I ordered, making 1. me almost finished with them and 2. them cold by the time the other two dishes came out. The food is very, very fresh. The next dish that arrived were the walnut buns (dim sum section of menu), which were slightly sweet and pleasant. The next dish that came out were steamed dumplings/jiaozi, that arrived piping hot. They were good, but really filling, so you should be fairly hungry when eating this dish if you’re by yourself. The problem with this dish was with the sauce that came with it, which I can’t even call sauce; it was just melted and very greasy sesame seed butter without any flavor at all. The service was really warm and friendly here, so I’d definitely come back to try more dishes, and bring someone with me next time. They have an iPad menu that has some English, and ordering is pretty easy.


Multiple Chinese herbs in the GallbladClear formula have been found in studies to carry out actions in modern biomedical terms supporting its use. These actions include increasing the secretion of bile from the liver and excretion of bile from the gallbladder; disintegrating sludge; increasing contraction of the gallbladder and movement of the bile duct; reducing the tension of the sphincter of Oddi, the muscular valve surrounding the exit of the bile duct.1
The best historical treatment of Huiyuan, including translation of his biography, can be found in Erik Zürcher's The Buddhist Conquest of China (Leiden, 1959), pp. 204–253. For an overview of Huiyuan's thought, with emphasis on his deviation from the original Indian position, there is Walter Liebenthal's "Shih Hui-yüan's Buddhism as Set Forth in His Writings," Journal of the American Oriental Society 70 (1950): 243–259. Huiyuan's major essay, The Śraṃana Does Not Pay Homage to the Ruler (Shamen bu jing wangzhe lun ), is fully translated by Leon Hurvitz in "'Render unto Caesar' in Early Chinese Buddhism," in Liebenthal Festschrift, "Sino-Indian Studies," vol. 5, pts. 3–4, edited by Roy Kshitis (Santiniketan, 1957), pp. 80–114. An assessment of Huiyuan's understanding of Mādhyamika philosophy, plus translation of his correspondence with Kumārajīva and a list of all of his extant writings with textual references, can be found in Richard Robinson's Early Mādhyamika in India and China (Madison, Wis., 1967), pp. 96–114, 181–205. Eon Kenkyū, 2 vols., edited by Kimura Eiichi (Kyoto, 1960–1962), is the most thorough work on this figure; it includes studies on Huiyuan, his texts and translations.
HUIYUAN (334–416), more fully Shi Huiyuan or Lüshan Huiyuan, Chinese Buddhist monk. Born to a literati family named Jia in Yanmen (Shanxi province), Huiyuan went to Henan at the age of thirteen to study both the Confucian classics and the Laozi and Zhuangzi. When he was twenty he met the eminent Buddhist monk Dao'an (312–385), whose personality and explanation of the philosophy of the "perfection of wisdom" (Skt., prajñāpāramitā ) impressed him so much that he embraced Buddhism and became his disciple. He remained with Dao'an for twenty-four years, residing mostly at Xiangyang. In 378 the invading Qin army forced master and disciple to separate. Huiyuan went south and eventually settled on Mount Lü in Jiangxi, where one of his colleagues from his days in Xiangyang, Huiyong, interceded on his behalf to have the Donglin Monastery built for him around 384. He remained there until his death thirty years later.

†These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Contents in www.activeherb.com is for information purpose only and are written to our best knowledge and expertise for the scientific accuracy. They are not to replace the advice of your physicians. The research cited in our contents are published in scientific journals and have not subjected to the FDA evaluation. We reserve the copyright to protect our contents. Any reproduction without in its entirety and without explicit credits to ActiveHerb is prohibited.
Sun Min, wife of a Chinese businessman, was found guilty of insider trading in Huiyuan shares by the Market Misconduct Tribunal in Hong Kong. The businessman, Mo Feng, and Sun purchased 8.61 million shares in the company between 30 July and 29 August 2008, at between HK$3.78 and 4.66 (US$0.48–$0.60), then resold their shares HK$10.24–$11.12 (US$1.21–$1.43) each on 3–4 Sept. 2008, after Huiyuan's stock price had surged after the proposed takeover was announced. A profit of HK$55.1 million (US$7.09 million) was made from the trade.[9] Sun was convicted of having dealt in 3.13 million Huiyuan shares in August 2008[10] and was fined HK$20 million (US$2.56 million), the largest ever imposed for the crime in the territory.[11]
I'll start very briefly with the negatives! I wasn't a fan of the decor (or lack of), nor did I enjoy ordering from an iPad (since when did speaking to a human become so challenging), & the menu was good but slightly mish mash...noodles next to pesto pasta for example. The expats outnumbered locals by far, you can read what you want into that. As for the food: yum! The fried lotus root was so good, sweet and sour 'pork' was delightful and the 'ribs' were incredible. You'd pay an arm and a leg for vegan food that good in the UK so I'm not complaining! However, I do have one comment. The food seemed to be designed for a Western pallet...by that I mean it reminded me of a Chinese takeaway you would get on a Saturday night while watching TV. Very sweet and not too spicy. Of course it's 10x better than that and cruelty free which is fab!!! But if you want something more authentic Chinese then go to Godly (not far from People's Square). If you have time then go to both and decide for yourself! If you can only go to one then my preference would be Godly.
Huiyuan also enjoyed enormous popularity among the gentry of South China, for it was to this group that he primarily directed his literary efforts. Some thirty of his works, in the form of letters, essays, prefaces, eulogies, or inscriptions, are extant. Unlike Dao'an, who primarily wrote commentaries for the Buddhist clergy, Huiyuan addressed issues that most concerned the gentry: rebirth, the immortality of the soul, the doctrine of karman, and the nature of the dharmakāya. His previous classical training made him successful in explaining these concepts in terms of the philosophical outlook of the Chinese elite, which at the time was dominated by xuanxue ("dark learning") speculations into the underlying source (ben ) of phenomena. That he never once quoted a Buddhist sūtra by name but made numerous allusions to the Confucian classics attests to his fervent desire to bring Buddhism into the mainstream of Chinese spiritual and intellectual life. Modern scholars have identified certain areas in which Huiyuan's understanding of important Buddhist concepts deviates from that of the Indian texts. They have attributed this both to his concern to present Buddhist notions in a form comprehensible to the Chinese, as in his postulation of a cosmic soul (shen ) as a means of explaining the process of rebirth, or to his frank inability in some instances to master the subtleties of Buddhist doctrine. This is particularly evident in his treatment of the Mādhyamika concepts introduced into China by Kumārajīva. Huiyuan's correspondence with this, perhaps the greatest of all Buddhist translators, is one of our richest sources of information on the development of Buddhist thought in fifth-century China.
In the year 404, Huiyuan wrote a treatise On Why Monks Do Not Bow Down Before Kings (沙門不敬王者論).[4] This book symbolized his efforts to assert the political independence of Buddhist clergy from the courts of monarchic rulers. At the same time, it was a religious and political text that aimed to convince monarchs and Confucian-minded ministers of state that followers of Buddhism were ultimately not subversive. He argued that Buddhists could make good subjects in a kingdom due to their beliefs in retribution of karma and the desire to be reborn in paradise. Despite the Buddhists' reputation of leaving their family behind for a monastic life, Huiyuan stated "those who rejoice in the Way of the Buddha invariably first serve their parents and obey their lords."[1]
On 3 September 2008, Atlantic Industries, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Coca-Cola Company, agreed to buy China Huiyuan Juice for HK$17.9 billion at HK$12.20 per share, three times more than its closing price of HK$4.14 on the previous day. Its shares closed at HK$10.94 on that day.[4] The proposed takeover was subject to anti-monopoly review by the Chinese Ministry of Commerce, which was scheduled to finish on 20 March 2009.[5] On 17 March, it was reported that Coca-Cola was considering abandoning the deal, as Chinese authorities insisted on relinquishing the Huiyuan brand name after acquisition.[6] On 18 March, the Ministry of Commerce disallowed the bid, citing market competition concerns.[7][8]
I can't believe I've only just tried this place after 2 years being in Shanghai, if you've not been yet then you're missing out. The huge Happy Cow banner was a most welcoming sign, we were greeted as we entered and brought an electronic menu straight away. The choice was vast, some dishes looked similar to Super Vegan so we went for different items. The prices were really reasonable, we had 8 items for 208rmb. The battered stuffed lotus root is a favourite of mine & this was perfect, with tiny chopped peppers to decorate. The boiled dumplings were really good with the peanut/sesame dipping sauce. I've had better spare ribs, they were just a bit chewy & not that tasty. The green beans were good, the corn cake good if slightly weird & the walnut buns were delicious, with a treacle like flavour. I definitely want to go back soon to try more of their dishes. We spoke with the owner/manager Fang who was excited we were from Happy Cow, I gave him his excellent reviews sticker & bunches of the smaller stickers, he was delighted.
On 3 September 2008, Atlantic Industries, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Coca-Cola Company, agreed to buy China Huiyuan Juice for HK$17.9 billion at HK$12.20 per share, three times more than its closing price of HK$4.14 on the previous day. Its shares closed at HK$10.94 on that day.[4] The proposed takeover was subject to anti-monopoly review by the Chinese Ministry of Commerce, which was scheduled to finish on 20 March 2009.[5] On 17 March, it was reported that Coca-Cola was considering abandoning the deal, as Chinese authorities insisted on relinquishing the Huiyuan brand name after acquisition.[6] On 18 March, the Ministry of Commerce disallowed the bid, citing market competition concerns.[7][8]
×