Name: 慧缘素食坊, address 黄浦区淮海东路49号(近地铁8号线大世界站). Spacious interior with Wi-Fi. Groups of 6-12 can be served at a round table on 2nd floor. Orders over a certain amount (500RMB at Jul 2019) can be served in private room. Directions: take exit 2 from the station (next to Starbucks), then take the second left. Restaurant is on the RHS. Note: Due to issues with our map providers in China the marker may not be accurate. Open Mon-Sun 11:00am-9:00pm. Last orders at 8:30pm.
Anyway, I decided to ask my mom and my grandmother about it and they told me a few legends. (I rewatched the episode "Alpha" too) All my mom and my grandmother told me was that the Wan Sheng Dhole was a type of dog and that it did die out due to hunting. It was a rare breed of dog with 5 toes and very unusual eyes. My grandmother believed that they were murderous men who had been cursed to walk the earth in the form of a dog…. Anyway, my mother told me to ask my grandfather about it (He is a Shinto Priest in Taiwan) I Realize this thread is almost a decade old now but I figured I might as well give some information incase anyone was interested. 

Huiyuan began studying the Zhuangzi and Laozi at a young age, as well as the teachings of Confucius. However, at the age of 21 he was converted in Hebei Province by the Buddhist Dao An, who was a Chinese disciple of a Kuchan missionary. Hearing the sermons of Dao An convinced Huiyuan to "leave the family" and embark on a life of Buddhist teachings.[1] Later, he became a patriarch of Donglin Temple (East Forest Temple) at Mount Lushan. His teachings were various, including the vinaya (戒律), meditation (禪法), abhidharma and Prajna or wisdom. Although Huiyuan did not take the initiative in establishing the relations with the secular world, he had contacts with court and gentry families. Huiyuan was on two occasions invited by the dictator Huan Xuan to take part in the discussions about the status of the clergy and Huiyuan defended the independence of the clergy. Members of the cultured classes came to live on Mount Lu as Huiyuan's lay disciples to take part in the religious life. Besides his teaching and interaction with lay followers of the Buddhist faith, he also upheld a learned correspondence with the monk Kumarajiva.[2]
It’s super easy to find, and there’s a clear Happy Cow sign on the window. I had a fried mushroom dish which was super yummy. Unfortunately it came out way sooner than the other two dishes I ordered, making 1. me almost finished with them and 2. them cold by the time the other two dishes came out. The food is very, very fresh. The next dish that arrived were the walnut buns (dim sum section of menu), which were slightly sweet and pleasant. The next dish that came out were steamed dumplings/jiaozi, that arrived piping hot. They were good, but really filling, so you should be fairly hungry when eating this dish if you’re by yourself. The problem with this dish was with the sauce that came with it, which I can’t even call sauce; it was just melted and very greasy sesame seed butter without any flavor at all. The service was really warm and friendly here, so I’d definitely come back to try more dishes, and bring someone with me next time. They have an iPad menu that has some English, and ordering is pretty easy.
Jiaozuo (Chinese: 焦作; pinyin: Jiāozuò [tɕjáu.tswô]; postal: Tsiaotso) is a prefecture-level city in northern Henan province, China. Sitting on the northern bank of the Yellow River, it borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to the south, Xinxiang to the east, Jiyuan to the west, Luoyang to the southwest, and the province of Shanxi to the north.Jiaozuo is one of the core cities of the Central Plains urban agglomeration and a regional central city in the Jin-Yu border area.link
On 3 September 2008, Atlantic Industries, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Coca-Cola Company, agreed to buy China Huiyuan Juice for HK$17.9 billion at HK$12.20 per share, three times more than its closing price of HK$4.14 on the previous day. Its shares closed at HK$10.94 on that day.[4] The proposed takeover was subject to anti-monopoly review by the Chinese Ministry of Commerce, which was scheduled to finish on 20 March 2009.[5] On 17 March, it was reported that Coca-Cola was considering abandoning the deal, as Chinese authorities insisted on relinquishing the Huiyuan brand name after acquisition.[6] On 18 March, the Ministry of Commerce disallowed the bid, citing market competition concerns.[7][8]
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