I came here three days in a row. Food is great, everything I had was too sweet though, the reason might be Shanghai itself. They have lots of substitute for any kind of meat. Staff is friendly, they don't speak English but they have an English menu on tablet PC. Must be aware, menu is a bit deceptive, portions look so small that makes you feel like you have to order multiple options. Portions are fullfilling.
So this has now become a regular on my circuit of restaurants. My brother was visiting me and I took him here to try the dumplings but more so to try the battered stuffed lotus root, they are similar to large thick slices of potato in batter that are served in chippies in Manchester where we grew up, also the mixed veg curry was amazing with fried potato, broccoli, mushrooms and carrot, this has become a must have. My most recent visit was with three other vegans, we ordered so much food the owner was worried we wouldn't finish it all, we did all but three steamed buns which we took away. The wheat gluten with veg is delicious, such a light tasty gravy. The walnut buns are almost like a pecan pie, the Buddha cakes are delicious 6 round green pastry cookies with sesame seeds and inside is taro or purple sweet potato. All our food for four people came to 369 rmb which is a bargain. My advice is to bring your own take away container and order more than you eat, you'll be glad to take away the leftovers and have them later. Also the staff are lovely and friendly.

The Donglin Monastery soon became the most famous center of Buddhism in southern China and continued to be so for several centuries after Huiyuan's death. Much of this prestige derived from the high esteem in which Huiyuan was held by the courts of the Eastern Jin dynasty in the South and the Yao Qin dynasty in the North, and by local rulers, who regarded him as the bulwark and paragon of Buddhist virtue. Huiyuan was active as a scholar and proponent of Buddhism, improving its status in China by increasing the number of texts available in translation and by defending the religion against its opponents. He sent certain of his disciples west to gather scriptures, of which over two hundred were eventually translated. He was also involved in the activities of many translators, three of whom represented three important tendencies in Buddhism: Saṃghadeva (Abhidharma texts), Buddhabhadra (dhyāna texts), and Kumārajīva (Mādhyamika texts). In 404, in response to the anti-Buddhist policies of Huan Xuan, the usurper of the Eastern Jin, Huiyuan elaborated his position on church-state relations in his influential The Śraṃana Does Not Pay Homage to the Ruler. Here he argued that of the two groups in Buddhism, the laity and the clergy, the former is subject to temporal authority but not the latter, since its members had abandoned society for nonworldly ends.
Among Huiyuan's many accomplishments, his devotional group probably had the most enduring influence on Chinese Buddhism. In 402 Huiyuan and 123 lay and clerical disciples gathered before an image of the Buddha Amitābha and made a collective vow to be reborn together in his Pure Land. Huiyuan's devotional group served as a model for the lay-based Buddhist societies of the mid-Tang and Song periods, the most well known of which is the White Lotus Society of the early twelfth century. This group claimed to take its name from that of Huiyuan's confraternity; modern scholarship, however, has shown the name to be of later origin. The deliberate evocation of Huiyuan's legacy some eight hundred years after his death, however, attests vividly to his enduring prestige in the Chinese Buddhist community. His influence continues to be acknowledged by the Pure Land traditions of both China and Japan, which have traditionally regarded Huiyuan as their founder and first patriarch.

We straight feasted at this place...to the point where locals kinda looked at us like we were crazy. Wonton soup was on point, fried rice and fried noodles to dies for, and mock meats/delicious tofu. Oh and the walnut bun things were crazy tasty for desert. Prices were way to cheap for the quality of food and I enjoyed every minute within this restraunt. Hella recommended, would come back again for breakfast and dinner if we were staying longer.
In the year 404, Huiyuan wrote a treatise On Why Monks Do Not Bow Down Before Kings (沙門不敬王者論).[4] This book symbolized his efforts to assert the political independence of Buddhist clergy from the courts of monarchic rulers. At the same time, it was a religious and political text that aimed to convince monarchs and Confucian-minded ministers of state that followers of Buddhism were ultimately not subversive. He argued that Buddhists could make good subjects in a kingdom due to their beliefs in retribution of karma and the desire to be reborn in paradise. Despite the Buddhists' reputation of leaving their family behind for a monastic life, Huiyuan stated "those who rejoice in the Way of the Buddha invariably first serve their parents and obey their lords."[1]
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Categories: 1956 birthsBusinesspeople in the oil industryBusinesspeople from ShenyangLiving peopleMembers of the 19th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaMembers of the 18th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaAlternate members of the 17th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaPoliticians from ShenyangPeople's Republic of China politicians from LiaoningCommunist Party of China politicians from LiaoningMembers of the Chinese Academy of EngineeringGovernment ministers of the People's Republic of ChinaPetroleum engineersEngineers from Liaoning
Categories: 1956 birthsBusinesspeople in the oil industryBusinesspeople from ShenyangLiving peopleMembers of the 19th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaMembers of the 18th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaAlternate members of the 17th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaPoliticians from ShenyangPeople's Republic of China politicians from LiaoningCommunist Party of China politicians from LiaoningMembers of the Chinese Academy of EngineeringGovernment ministers of the People's Republic of ChinaPetroleum engineersEngineers from Liaoning
Qingdao Airport is the sole international gateway of the Shandong Province. Qingdao seaport is one of the major ports in China and in the world. The Jiaozhou Bay Bridge is the world's longest sea bridges. In Laoshan Mountain you'll find several Taoist temples to rest. Qingdao is home of Tsintao brewery, the second largest in China. Qingdao is also famous for its temperate climate and beautiful beaches.
Name: 慧缘素食坊, address 黄浦区淮海东路49号(近地铁8号线大世界站). Spacious interior with Wi-Fi. Groups of 6-12 can be served at a round table on 2nd floor. Orders over a certain amount (500RMB at Jul 2019) can be served in private room. Directions: take exit 2 from the station (next to Starbucks), then take the second left. Restaurant is on the RHS. Note: Due to issues with our map providers in China the marker may not be accurate. Open Mon-Sun 11:00am-9:00pm. Last orders at 8:30pm.
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