Huiyuan also enjoyed enormous popularity among the gentry of South China, for it was to this group that he primarily directed his literary efforts. Some thirty of his works, in the form of letters, essays, prefaces, eulogies, or inscriptions, are extant. Unlike Dao'an, who primarily wrote commentaries for the Buddhist clergy, Huiyuan addressed issues that most concerned the gentry: rebirth, the immortality of the soul, the doctrine of karman, and the nature of the dharmakāya. His previous classical training made him successful in explaining these concepts in terms of the philosophical outlook of the Chinese elite, which at the time was dominated by xuanxue ("dark learning") speculations into the underlying source (ben ) of phenomena. That he never once quoted a Buddhist sūtra by name but made numerous allusions to the Confucian classics attests to his fervent desire to bring Buddhism into the mainstream of Chinese spiritual and intellectual life. Modern scholars have identified certain areas in which Huiyuan's understanding of important Buddhist concepts deviates from that of the Indian texts. They have attributed this both to his concern to present Buddhist notions in a form comprehensible to the Chinese, as in his postulation of a cosmic soul (shen ) as a means of explaining the process of rebirth, or to his frank inability in some instances to master the subtleties of Buddhist doctrine. This is particularly evident in his treatment of the Mādhyamika concepts introduced into China by Kumārajīva. Huiyuan's correspondence with this, perhaps the greatest of all Buddhist translators, is one of our richest sources of information on the development of Buddhist thought in fifth-century China.

On February 13, 2004, Yuntai Mountain as the fifth in the world, the third in the country China, was named the world's first World Geopark by UNESCO and caused attention at home and abroad. Meanwhile, Yuntaishan is also a national scenic spot, National Civilized Scenic Area, the first national AAAAA-level scenic spot, national natural heritage, national forest parks, national macaque nature reserve. Yuntain Mountain also has Asia's highest head drop waterfall.

Qingdao is a beautiful coastal city. You can enjoy the fresh air and the leisure time here. Walking to the beach, you can see the clear sea water and distant coast-line. The #seafood is quite cheap in Qingdao. What an amazing idea to taste some seafood while feeling the cool wind from the sea. LaoMountain in Qingdao is also a great choice for sightseeing.


On 3 September 2008, Atlantic Industries, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Coca-Cola Company, agreed to buy China Huiyuan Juice for HK$17.9 billion at HK$12.20 per share, three times more than its closing price of HK$4.14 on the previous day. Its shares closed at HK$10.94 on that day.[4] The proposed takeover was subject to anti-monopoly review by the Chinese Ministry of Commerce, which was scheduled to finish on 20 March 2009.[5] On 17 March, it was reported that Coca-Cola was considering abandoning the deal, as Chinese authorities insisted on relinquishing the Huiyuan brand name after acquisition.[6] On 18 March, the Ministry of Commerce disallowed the bid, citing market competition concerns.[7][8]
Qingdao Airport is the sole international gateway of the Shandong Province. Qingdao seaport is one of the major ports in China and in the world. The Jiaozhou Bay Bridge is the world's longest sea bridges. In Laoshan Mountain you'll find several Taoist temples to rest. Qingdao is home of Tsintao brewery, the second largest in China. Qingdao is also famous for its temperate climate and beautiful beaches.
I can't believe I've only just tried this place after 2 years being in Shanghai, if you've not been yet then you're missing out. The huge Happy Cow banner was a most welcoming sign, we were greeted as we entered and brought an electronic menu straight away. The choice was vast, some dishes looked similar to Super Vegan so we went for different items. The prices were really reasonable, we had 8 items for 208rmb. The battered stuffed lotus root is a favourite of mine & this was perfect, with tiny chopped peppers to decorate. The boiled dumplings were really good with the peanut/sesame dipping sauce. I've had better spare ribs, they were just a bit chewy & not that tasty. The green beans were good, the corn cake good if slightly weird & the walnut buns were delicious, with a treacle like flavour. I definitely want to go back soon to try more of their dishes. We spoke with the owner/manager Fang who was excited we were from Happy Cow, I gave him his excellent reviews sticker & bunches of the smaller stickers, he was delighted.
Qingdao Airport is the sole international gateway of the Shandong Province. Qingdao seaport is one of the major ports in China and in the world. The Jiaozhou Bay Bridge is the world's longest sea bridges. In Laoshan Mountain you'll find several Taoist temples to rest. Qingdao is home of Tsintao brewery, the second largest in China. Qingdao is also famous for its temperate climate and beautiful beaches.
Three Qing Dynasty novels are collectively known as the Romance of Di Qing and are attributed to Li Yutang. The central character in all 3 novels is Di Qing. The first one is originally titled "Pavilion of Ten Thousand Flowers" (萬花樓); the second one is titled "Five Tigers Conquering the West" (五虎征西) and the last one is titled "Five Tigers Conquering the South" (五虎平南). The novels also prominently feature Yang Zongbao from the Yang clan and Bao Zheng as the protagonists.

Qingyuan is a major economic and transportation hub. The Beijing–Guangzhou Railway, National Highways 106 and 107, and the Bei or North River cross through the city. The maritime infrastructure in Qingyuan plays a vital role in transporting goods to other regional centers in Guangdong, Hong Kong, and Macao. The major ports are Qingyuan Port, Yingde Port, Lianzhou Port, and Yangshan Port.
Jiaozuo is noted for its blast furnaces and machine construction industries. The total GDP of the city in 2017 was 234.28 billion yuan, an increase of 7.4% over the previous year. Among them, the added value of the primary industry was 13.733 billion yuan, up 4.6%; the added value of the secondary industry was 13.841 billion yuan, up 6.7%; the added value of the tertiary industry was 81.143 billion yuan, up 9.1%. The per capita GDP reached 65,936 yuan. The three industrial structures changed from 6.4:59.3:34.3 of 2016 to 5.9:59.5:34.6.link

Qingyuan's administrative area ranges in latitude from 23° 26' 56" to 25° 11' 40" N, and in longitude from 111° 55' 17" to 113° 55' 34" E;[1] its urban area is located just north of the Tropic of Cancer, about 60 km (37 mi) from the urban area of Guangzhou and 200 km (120 mi) from both Hong Kong and Macau. Its area of over 19,000 km2 (7,300 sq mi) accounts for 10.6% of the total provincial area.[1] Qingyuan contains part of the southern Nan Ling, and more than half of the area is mountainous, and elevations increase from southeast to northwest. Bordering prefectures are Guangzhou and Foshan to the southeast, Zhaoqing to the southwest, Shaoguan to the north and northeast, Hezhou (Guangxi) to the west, and Yongzhou and Chenzhou (Hunan) to the north.[1]


China Huiyuan Juice Group Limited (Chinese: 中国汇源果汁集团有限公司; pinyin: Zhōngguó Huìyuán Guǒzhī Jítuán Yǒuxiàn Gōngsī) (SEHK: 1886), established in 1992 and headquartered in Beijing, is the largest privately owned juice producer in China.[1] It is engaged in the manufacture and sales of juice and other beverage products. Its products include fruit juice and vegetable juice, nectars, bottled water, tea, and dairy drinks.[2]

Qingyuan, formerly romanized as Tsingyun,[a] is a prefecture-level city in northern Guangdong province, China, on the banks of the Bei or North River. During the 2010 census, its total population was 3,698,412, out of whom 1,510,044 lived in the urbanized Qingcheng and Qingxin districts. The primary spoken language is Cantonese. Covering 19,015 km2 (7,342 sq mi), Qingyuan is Guangdong's largest prefecture-level division by land area, and it borders Guangzhou and Foshan to the south, Shaoguan to the east and northeast, Zhaoqing to the south and southwest, and Hunan province and Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region to the north.[1] The urban core is surrounded by mountainous areas but is directly connected with Guangzhou and the Pearl River Delta by Highway 107.
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