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I came here three days in a row. Food is great, everything I had was too sweet though, the reason might be Shanghai itself. They have lots of substitute for any kind of meat. Staff is friendly, they don't speak English but they have an English menu on tablet PC. Must be aware, menu is a bit deceptive, portions look so small that makes you feel like you have to order multiple options. Portions are fullfilling.


Jiaozuo (Chinese: 焦作; pinyin: Jiāozuò [tɕjáu.tswô]; postal: Tsiaotso) is a prefecture-level city in northern Henan province, China. Sitting on the northern bank of the Yellow River, it borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to the south, Xinxiang to the east, Jiyuan to the west, Luoyang to the southwest, and the province of Shanxi to the north.Jiaozuo is one of the core cities of the Central Plains urban agglomeration and a regional central city in the Jin-Yu border area.link
This was some of the most delicious food I have ever eaten. 6 months later and my kids are still talking about how good it was. We had a huge variety of dishes in the two times we went here. The pesto noodles were a welcome change from heavier Asian options and my daughter truly enjoy her vegan pork chop. We are a little of everything but the walnut buns were decidedly the best food we ever tasted. My life goal is to find a recipe to make these at home. Don’t miss out on this place. Its truly wonderful.

The best historical treatment of Huiyuan, including translation of his biography, can be found in Erik Zürcher's The Buddhist Conquest of China (Leiden, 1959), pp. 204–253. For an overview of Huiyuan's thought, with emphasis on his deviation from the original Indian position, there is Walter Liebenthal's "Shih Hui-yüan's Buddhism as Set Forth in His Writings," Journal of the American Oriental Society 70 (1950): 243–259. Huiyuan's major essay, The Śraṃana Does Not Pay Homage to the Ruler (Shamen bu jing wangzhe lun ), is fully translated by Leon Hurvitz in "'Render unto Caesar' in Early Chinese Buddhism," in Liebenthal Festschrift, "Sino-Indian Studies," vol. 5, pts. 3–4, edited by Roy Kshitis (Santiniketan, 1957), pp. 80–114. An assessment of Huiyuan's understanding of Mādhyamika philosophy, plus translation of his correspondence with Kumārajīva and a list of all of his extant writings with textual references, can be found in Richard Robinson's Early Mādhyamika in India and China (Madison, Wis., 1967), pp. 96–114, 181–205. Eon Kenkyū, 2 vols., edited by Kimura Eiichi (Kyoto, 1960–1962), is the most thorough work on this figure; it includes studies on Huiyuan, his texts and translations.
ok so i was watchin season 6 of the Xfiles...and i was watching 1 episode about a rare dog... called the Wanshang Dhole. now they say its an chinese dog of some kind...but being a TV show i dont know if it acually true or not. now im chinese so it interests me even more...i tried to google it, but all i came up with is just stuff about the episode, nothing about the atual dog.
This was some of the most delicious food I have ever eaten. 6 months later and my kids are still talking about how good it was. We had a huge variety of dishes in the two times we went here. The pesto noodles were a welcome change from heavier Asian options and my daughter truly enjoy her vegan pork chop. We are a little of everything but the walnut buns were decidedly the best food we ever tasted. My life goal is to find a recipe to make these at home. Don’t miss out on this place. Its truly wonderful.
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