It’s super easy to find, and there’s a clear Happy Cow sign on the window. I had a fried mushroom dish which was super yummy. Unfortunately it came out way sooner than the other two dishes I ordered, making 1. me almost finished with them and 2. them cold by the time the other two dishes came out. The food is very, very fresh. The next dish that arrived were the walnut buns (dim sum section of menu), which were slightly sweet and pleasant. The next dish that came out were steamed dumplings/jiaozi, that arrived piping hot. They were good, but really filling, so you should be fairly hungry when eating this dish if you’re by yourself. The problem with this dish was with the sauce that came with it, which I can’t even call sauce; it was just melted and very greasy sesame seed butter without any flavor at all. The service was really warm and friendly here, so I’d definitely come back to try more dishes, and bring someone with me next time. They have an iPad menu that has some English, and ordering is pretty easy.
1850. Around this year, the Chinese Wanshang Dhole wild dog  is believed to become extinct. The dog, a scavanger, is also the basis for Chinese myth  and legend which calls it a trickster dog, able to open doors, steal wives and disappear  into thin air. The Wangshang Dhole may also be related to a form of Chinese werewolf, which does not become extinct.
Huiyuan also enjoyed enormous popularity among the gentry of South China, for it was to this group that he primarily directed his literary efforts. Some thirty of his works, in the form of letters, essays, prefaces, eulogies, or inscriptions, are extant. Unlike Dao'an, who primarily wrote commentaries for the Buddhist clergy, Huiyuan addressed issues that most concerned the gentry: rebirth, the immortality of the soul, the doctrine of karman, and the nature of the dharmakāya. His previous classical training made him successful in explaining these concepts in terms of the philosophical outlook of the Chinese elite, which at the time was dominated by xuanxue ("dark learning") speculations into the underlying source (ben ) of phenomena. That he never once quoted a Buddhist sūtra by name but made numerous allusions to the Confucian classics attests to his fervent desire to bring Buddhism into the mainstream of Chinese spiritual and intellectual life. Modern scholars have identified certain areas in which Huiyuan's understanding of important Buddhist concepts deviates from that of the Indian texts. They have attributed this both to his concern to present Buddhist notions in a form comprehensible to the Chinese, as in his postulation of a cosmic soul (shen ) as a means of explaining the process of rebirth, or to his frank inability in some instances to master the subtleties of Buddhist doctrine. This is particularly evident in his treatment of the Mādhyamika concepts introduced into China by Kumārajīva. Huiyuan's correspondence with this, perhaps the greatest of all Buddhist translators, is one of our richest sources of information on the development of Buddhist thought in fifth-century China.

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Among Huiyuan's many accomplishments, his devotional group probably had the most enduring influence on Chinese Buddhism. In 402 Huiyuan and 123 lay and clerical disciples gathered before an image of the Buddha Amitābha and made a collective vow to be reborn together in his Pure Land. Huiyuan's devotional group served as a model for the lay-based Buddhist societies of the mid-Tang and Song periods, the most well known of which is the White Lotus Society of the early twelfth century. This group claimed to take its name from that of Huiyuan's confraternity; modern scholarship, however, has shown the name to be of later origin. The deliberate evocation of Huiyuan's legacy some eight hundred years after his death, however, attests vividly to his enduring prestige in the Chinese Buddhist community. His influence continues to be acknowledged by the Pure Land traditions of both China and Japan, which have traditionally regarded Huiyuan as their founder and first patriarch.
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It’s super easy to find, and there’s a clear Happy Cow sign on the window. I had a fried mushroom dish which was super yummy. Unfortunately it came out way sooner than the other two dishes I ordered, making 1. me almost finished with them and 2. them cold by the time the other two dishes came out. The food is very, very fresh. The next dish that arrived were the walnut buns (dim sum section of menu), which were slightly sweet and pleasant. The next dish that came out were steamed dumplings/jiaozi, that arrived piping hot. They were good, but really filling, so you should be fairly hungry when eating this dish if you’re by yourself. The problem with this dish was with the sauce that came with it, which I can’t even call sauce; it was just melted and very greasy sesame seed butter without any flavor at all. The service was really warm and friendly here, so I’d definitely come back to try more dishes, and bring someone with me next time. They have an iPad menu that has some English, and ordering is pretty easy.
On 3 September 2008, Atlantic Industries, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Coca-Cola Company, agreed to buy China Huiyuan Juice for HK$17.9 billion at HK$12.20 per share, three times more than its closing price of HK$4.14 on the previous day. Its shares closed at HK$10.94 on that day.[4] The proposed takeover was subject to anti-monopoly review by the Chinese Ministry of Commerce, which was scheduled to finish on 20 March 2009.[5] On 17 March, it was reported that Coca-Cola was considering abandoning the deal, as Chinese authorities insisted on relinquishing the Huiyuan brand name after acquisition.[6] On 18 March, the Ministry of Commerce disallowed the bid, citing market competition concerns.[7][8]
On 3 September 2008, Atlantic Industries, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Coca-Cola Company, agreed to buy China Huiyuan Juice for HK$17.9 billion at HK$12.20 per share, three times more than its closing price of HK$4.14 on the previous day. Its shares closed at HK$10.94 on that day.[4] The proposed takeover was subject to anti-monopoly review by the Chinese Ministry of Commerce, which was scheduled to finish on 20 March 2009.[5] On 17 March, it was reported that Coca-Cola was considering abandoning the deal, as Chinese authorities insisted on relinquishing the Huiyuan brand name after acquisition.[6] On 18 March, the Ministry of Commerce disallowed the bid, citing market competition concerns.[7][8]
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